Come here often? Make XFINITY.com your homepage » close

Get instant access to XFINITY.com. Download the XFINITY® One Click Google extension» close

close

Your XFINITY Connect session has timed out due to inactivity. Click here to go back close

Scientific News and Headlines for Space, the Environment, and Climate

Ad Info - Ad Feedback

Storms may brew, but in N. Korea pride over new satellite

Loading... Share No Thanks

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Hours after the rest of the world already knew, North Korea's state media triumphantly announced in a special ... Full Story

Featured News

  • Storms may brew, but in N. Korea pride over new satellite
    Storms may brew, but in N. Korea pride over new satellite

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Hours after the rest of the world already knew, North Korea's state media triumphantly announced in a special news bulletin to the nation Sunday it had successfully launched a satellite into orbit, calling it a major milestone in the nation's history and the "greatest ift of loyalty" to the country's young leader, Kim Jong Un.

  • Sakurajima volcano erupts spectacularly in southern Japan
    Sakurajima volcano erupts spectacularly in southern Japan

    TOKYO (AP) — One of Japan's most active volcanos erupted spectacularly Friday evening with a fiery blast that sent lava rolling down its slope.

  • EPA: Traces of contaminant found in 3 Colorado water systems
    EPA: Traces of contaminant found in 3 Colorado water systems

    DENVER (AP) — Traces of widely used and potentially harmful chemicals have shown up in three drinking water systems in Colorado, prompting officials to shut down three wells and start looking for the source.

  • EPA: Mine spill dumped 880,000 pounds of metals in river
    EPA: Mine spill dumped 880,000 pounds of metals in river

    DENVER (AP) — A 3 million-gallon spill from a southwestern Colorado gold mine last year may have dumped more than 880,000 pounds of metals into the Animas River, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday.

  • First research links California quakes to oil operations

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A 2005 spate of quakes in California's Central Valley almost certainly was triggered by oilfield injection underground, a study published Thursday said in the first such link in California between oil and gas operations and earthquakes.

  • Data gaps hinder explanation for Alaska seabird die-off

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A preliminary investigation into the massive die-off of common murres, one of the Northern Hemisphere's most abundant seabirds, off Alaska's coast is revealing gaps in basic information on North Pacific waters and the wildlife that inhabit them.

  • Move sought for Japan's oldest elephant may be too late
    Move sought for Japan's oldest elephant may be too late

    TOKYO (AP) — In the humble zoo, among the small cages of owls, guinea pigs and raccoons, Japan's oldest elephant stands in a concrete pen about the size of half of a basketball court. She drinks sugar water from a bucket and munches on bananas with her last remaining tooth while a debate is being wged about where she should live out her final years.

  • Health officials want more Zika samples, data from Brazil
    Health officials want more Zika samples, data from Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil is not sharing enough samples and disease data to let researchers determine whether the Zika virus is, as feared, linked to the increased number of babies born with abnormally small heads in the South American country, U.N. and U.S. health officials say.

  • South African rangers seek to track rhinos in wildlife park
    South African rangers seek to track rhinos in wildlife park

    KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa (AP) — A heavily pregnant rhino lay in the scrub in a South African wildlife park, sedated by rangers who attached a tracking device to the threatened animal as part of efforts to stop poaching in a country with most of the world's rhinos.

  • Stanford names New York university leader as next president
    Stanford names New York university leader as next president

    PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) — A neuroscientist who leads a prestigious graduate school and biomedical research institute in New York City was named Thursday as Stanford University's next president, a position he said he would use to champion basic research and the value of a liberal arts education.

Photo Gallery

Adobe Flash Player Update

You seem to be missing the correct version of Flash!

We'll help you get started. Get the latest Flash Player.

GET FLASH

Most Popular News

Ad Info - Ad Feedback

Loading...